NOW SHIPPING FROM AUSTRALIA + USA

NOW SHIPPING FROM AUSTRALIA + USA

I've Just Started Running In Luna Sandals

by Rebecca Rushton

Stephen's blister question:

I have recently changed from running shoes to Luna Sandals (no socks) to run in. The first 4 or 5 runs on the flat were fine, I did a hilly run (16K) 2 days ago and could tell during the run I was going to blister on the balls of my feet. Just wondering what you would advise moving forward. Should I treat with donut pads and manage with Engo patches or should I be looking at wearing socks with the sandals. I was hoping to do an ultra marathon in the sandals end of October.  Thank you for your website & help.

getting blisters with luna sandalsLuna sandals

 

My reply

Thanks for getting in touch Stephen. Wow, big change for your feet! Here are a collection of my thoughts about your options:

Socks

Socks will definitely help and if it's no trouble to wear them, I'd do it. Socks don't guarantee blister prevention, but they'll go a decent way towards it. They'll also protect your feet from abrasion (sand, grit etc).

ENGO Blister Patches

These might work too well. If it's just a discrete area that's blistering under the ball of your foot, and you can cover this with a small or large oval, fine. But if you need wider protection in the form of a rectangle patch, we might be reducing friction too far over too large an area. More than ever, now you're in a sandal, you rely on high-ish friction levels under your foot to keep your foot stuck and relatively stationary on the shoe. Plus there's the hold provided by the upper, which has now been cut down to a few straps. So if there is significantly less friction holding the sole of your foot, I fear your foot will slide forward too easily and you'll get trouble from the pressure exerted by the straps.

Taping

Taping could be worth a try. I don't think taping reduces friction levels too much (nor do socks for that matter, but they do a little bit plus they're an extra interface which serves as protection). It could all end in tears though if the tape comes loose and folds over itself and becomes an irritant - so it definitely has its limitations. But assuming you need broad protection across the ball of the foot, I think taping might serve you better than ENGO in sandals (don't ask me which one Stephen - have a read of this if you haven't already). 

Donut Pads

Keep these up your sleeve for blister treatment, should it come to it.

blister prevention with luna sandals

Luna Trail Sandals - Image credit

 

To wrap up

Right now, I favour socks. If that's not enough, add taping. If that didn't do the trick, I'd add an ENGO rectangle patch and hope the straps don't annoy too much (I'm really keen to know how that would go now). And if you still manage to blister, then donut pads (plus the appropriate dressing).

 

early luna sandals
An early version of Luna Sandals - Image credit - TrailRunMag




Rebecca Rushton
Rebecca Rushton

Author

Podiatrist, blister prone ex-hockey player, foot blister thought-leaderauthor and educator. Can’t cook. Loves test cricket.


Leave a comment


Also in Blister Blog

thick toenails
Thick Toenails: Cause, Symptoms, Treatment & Pictures

by Rebecca Rushton

Thick toenails are common, especially as we get older. There are also disease states that thicken nails. But you don’t have to be old or have a medical condition to get thick toenails (onychauxis). It only takes one episode of trauma to the right (or should I say wrong) part of your toe and you’ll be stuck with one thick toenail for life.

View full article →

How To Tell If Your Blister Is Infected, And What To Do About It
How To Tell If Your Blister Is Infected, And What To Do About It

by Rebecca Rushton

Infected blisters get worse before they get better. Thankfully there are tell tale signs your blister is infected. Learn how to spot it and what to do about it.

View full article →

What Is Tinea Pedis? Can You Prevent It?
What Is Tinea Pedis? Can You Prevent It?

by Rebecca Rushton

Tinea Pedis or Athlete’s Foot is a common foot problem. It often appears as blisters. But tinea blisters are very different to friction blisters.

View full article →