Blister Prone - Is There Such A Thing?

by Rebecca Rushton 2 Comments

It's official, blister prone is a real thing!

If your feet blister when others don't, it might not be that you've got the wrong shoes or you're doing anything wrong. It might just be that your skin is less resistant to blister-causing forces... like mine is.

I've got three studies that show without a doubt, some people's feet are more prone to blisters than others. See it for yourself. 

 

Research demonstrating the entity of blister prone

Blister study 1: 1955

An early experimental blister study on 19 volunteer British medical students and doctors, showed blistering occurred between 27 and 138 rubs. The middle of the shin was used in this experiment.

 

Blister study 2: 1966

Another experimental blister study 11 years later was conducted on 54 American army personnel. Some soldiers blistered in 3 minutes and others still hadn't blistered even after 50 minutes. The exact same frictional force was used on all subjects! It was applied to the palm of the hand - palmar (hand) skin and plantar (foot) skin are considered very similar. 

Are your feet blister prone

Foot blisters in the military are a big deal

 

Blister study 3: 2013

This next one is a lot more recent (non-military). It was performed at the University of Salford in England on 30 volunteers. The frictional force was applied to the back of the heel. It found that blister onset ranged from between 4 and 32 minutes. Quite a difference again!

 

 

Let's see those “time-to-blister” results again

  • Between 27 and 138 rubs
  • Between 3 and 50 minutes
  • Between 4 and 32 minutes

     

    Within each study, there are different individual responses to the same blister-causing shear force. It's the perfect demonstration of the large individual variation of susceptibility to blisters.

     

    Are your feet prone to blisters

    are your feet prone to blisters

    Does this sound familiar to you? It does to me. My feet blister very easily!

    Being blister prone can shape your lifestyle! It can force you to live a less active lifestyle than you might have otherwise led. It can force you to give up sports you're good at and activities you enjoy. I know of a basketballer and a triathlete who both gave away their sport prematurely, with persistent foot blisters figuring in their decision. Plus an underground miner who found it necessary to change his occupation because of ongoing foot blisters.

    If you're blister prone and you can't find a way to get your blister problem under control, there comes a time when you're just not prepared to put up with the pain any longer. And it's not just the pain, it's everything else that goes with it - it's time consuming, messy and an all-round inconvenience!

     

    The good news - blisters are 100% preventable

    Foot blisters are common, but they're not inevitable. And things have come a long way in recent years. We're better than ever at understanding what causes blisters and how to prevent them.

    If you’re blister prone and feel like you've tried everything, I'm sure I can help. In fact, I'm certain of it.

    Either search this site for the answers you need, or join my program Fix My Foot Blister Fast and I'll walk you through everything you need to know. Click that link, read the reviews, look at all the things I'll teach you, and how much it costs. Then think about how much it would be worth to you to not get blisters any more.

     





    Rebecca Rushton
    Rebecca Rushton

    Author

    Podiatrist, blister prone ex-hockey player, foot blister thought-leaderauthor and educator. Can’t cook. Loves test cricket.


    2 Responses

    Gitte
    Gitte

    May 09, 2020

    I also get blisters insanely quickly, often after only a minute or less walking. Primarily on my heel, but when I am wearing shoes with slippery soles also on the bottom of my feet. Because it’s mainly on my heel things like ankle boots help a lot, as they don’t have the corner of shoe-heel friction (by the way, my shoes are often too big too as my size is often unavailable, so my foot often falls out of an open shoe constantly causing more friction and movement). I have found shoes with very soft, smooth, buttery leather (hard leather you have to wear in is the worst!) or shoes with a lot of cushiony padding on the heel help a lot. But those aren’t always possible, or findable…

    Val McAlister
    Val McAlister

    May 08, 2019

    Hi, my 18 year old daughter is prone to blisters on her feet and hands. She plays ice hockey and always gets big insole blisters. Also, she has tried many different types of shoes but gets blisters in a matter of minutes, from almost all of them. Blisters between her toes, on the top of her feet, heels, etc. She also gets blisters anytime she lifts weights, does weightlifting bar work, etc with her hands. We cannot figure out how to help her. Thank you!

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