The Hydrocolloid White Gel Bubble - What Does It Look Like?

My mother came to visit last month.

She bought a new pair of shoes on her last day, wore them all day, walked all around town and guess what happened.

Blister!

She got a blister on her big toe that deroofed.

Bad news for mum.

But as it turned out, good news for me. Because I needed to photograph how a blister heals with a hydrocolloid plaster. There’s only one other photographic example of the hydrocolloid white gel bubble and I was keen to enhance that.

The only thing was she was leaving town that day. So she promised she would take photos and send them to me.

She did a great job. Her photos clearly show how the white gel bubble forms so you can see this is completely normal.

New deroofed blister with hydrocolloid blister plaster applied.

A white gel bubble starts to form within hours which indicates the wound is healing.

How Hydrocolloids Heal

Hydrocolloid blister plasters are exudate-absorbent hydrophilic gel dressings. They’re rubbery and slightly translucent. As your deroofed blister weeps, the hydrocolloid material absorbs the fluid and turns into a gel. From the outside, it looks like a white bubble. The dressing remains waterproof the whole time. The white bubble is a sign that your blister is healing.

You can learn more about how hydrocolloid blister plaster work here including:

  • When you should change your plaster

  • What your blister will look like when you take your plaster off

  • Why you should tape the edges of your plaster down

Blister healed after a week

Blister healed!

Mum sent me a photo of her healed blister a week later on her way down south 😃

Examples of Hydrocolloid Blister Plasters


REBECCA RUSHTON BSC (POD) - BLISTERPOD

REBECCA RUSHTON BSC (POD) - BLISTERPOD

Written by Rebecca Rushton

Rebecca is an Australian podiatrist with 25 years experience. She has spent a lifetime dealing with her own blister prone feet in her sporting and everyday life. Rebecca specialises in helping athletes and sports medicine professionals learn how to manage foot blisters with ease. And for kicks, she enjoys providing blister care at multiday ultramarathon events.

Comment

Rebecca Rushton

Rebecca is an Australian podiatrist with over 20 years experience. She has spent a lifetime dealing with her own blister prone feet in her sporting and everyday life. Rebecca specialises in helping athletes and sports medicine professionals figure out how to manage foot blisters with ease. And for kicks, she enjoys providing blister care at multiday ultramarathon events. Rebecca is the founder of Blister Prevention and author of both "The Blister Prone Athlete's Guide To Preventing Foot Blisters" and "The Advanced Guide to Blister Prevention".