Is Your Blister Care Plan Missing The Point When It Comes To Friction?

by Rebecca Rushton

Mine was… for a very long time!


I’m really bad at physics (I got a D in year 12). Which is unfortunate because a lot of podiatry and blister management involves physics. So I’ve had to work harder than most. The result is I’ve got a knack for explaining things so it makes sense to other people who don’t get physics.

Let me explain friction and blister care

Blister prevention and blister treatment

When you reduce friction, most people think you’re trying to reduce rubbing. In reality, it means you make things more slippery. They are opposite things.

Quick tip: I find it helps to add the word “level” after friction.

When I started reducing the friction LEVEL over my blister areas, I stopped getting blisters. I don’t mean to sound dramatic, but it was like there was a real-life miracle happening to my feet. I’ll never forget it.

  • I first did this with Engo patches. And it worked brilliantly.
  • Others use lubricants like BodyGlide - with just as much success
  • Or powders like 2Toms BlisterShield - with just as much success
  • Or double-sock systems like Armaskin - with just as much success
  • Or merino wool wrapped around their toes - with just as much success

All of these things hone in on friction LEVELS. They reduce friction LEVELS making things more slippery, which reduces the skin shear that causes blisters. 

Note, none of them are stopping anything from rubbing. They are all making things rub more – they’re reducing friction LEVELS and making things slippery.


So here’s a question about how you care for your foot blisters

Are you attacking friction from the right angle?

Watch this very short video – it shows you a real easy trick to remembering this.

PS: I did ACE one physics project in high school – to explain the physics of your favourite sport (mine’s hockey). It’s funny how when something is relevant, you find a way to get your head around it.





Rebecca Rushton
Rebecca Rushton

Author

Podiatrist, blister prone ex-hockey player, foot blister thought-leaderauthor and educator. Can’t cook. Loves test cricket.


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